New at Bodypump - bar weight question

Last post 06-18-2009, 7:56 PM by trancendental. 3 replies.

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  •  06-18-2009, 5:47 AM 60753

    New at Bodypump - bar weight question

    I'm RPM-ing for a few months now, and for the variety I want to start with bodypump.

     

    But what is the ideal weight of the bar to start with it? Is there a rule for it? I can not change the weights a couple of times during a track.

  •  06-18-2009, 2:43 PM 60779 in reply to 60753

    Re: New at Bodypump - bar weight question

    talk to the instructor before the class and they should help you select some weights based on your fitness level and background.  There's no real rule except to keep it light and focus on technique and safety first.  You won't have time to change weights during a track but don't be afraid to take a break during the track in your first few classes.
  •  06-18-2009, 4:36 PM 60786 in reply to 60753

    Re: New at Bodypump - bar weight question

    First-timers usually start of with either a 1.25kg plate on each side or a 2.5 kg on each side (should be light) and usually keep at the same weight. The more you do pump, you will realize that you can add more weight. You will feel sore after the first class, but continue with RPM to help with muscle recovery as well. Its important to take at least a day's rest in order for your muscles to recover properly.
  •  06-18-2009, 7:56 PM 60797 in reply to 60753

    Re: New at Bodypump - bar weight question

    BertPleizier:

    But what is the ideal weight of the bar to start with it? Is there a rule for it?


    There is no "rule" for what weights you have to use.

    LM publish a set of recommendations (that I'm sure Rod will post), that are worth considering but are not mandatory. They are just a guide for what would be a sensible starting point.

    What would be right for you will depend on how strong you are, what sort of cardio fitness you have and whether you already do any weight training.

    That said, it is always worth erring on the side of caution for the first few classes. Better to start with too little and have to increase, than start with too much and risk injury.




    As stated above, you should discuss this with your instructor. It is especially important to inform them that you are new. Then they can help you with weight choice and keep an eye on your technique.


    The forum member "pipera" is not a Les Mills Instructor, though his posts, signature and profile will falsely claim otherwise.

    Since he has been economical with the truth on his profile, read the real facts here.
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